Should Parliament Approve The Munich Agreement

Astor and Churchill had a notoriously hostile relationship and often used cleverly worded insults against one another, so this exchange would not have been unique. As an insolent American heiress, Astor clashed with Churchill, who did not think women should be in Parliament. Another possible reason for Astor`s opposition to Churchill`s points in his speech was his alleged links to Nazism. [13] [14] In a debate in the House of Commons, Winston Churchill, then a member of Epping, challenged Chancellor sir John Simon`s request to “reaffirm the policy of Her Majesty`s Government that avoided war during the recent crisis.” For MPs at the time, a vote for John Simon`s request would give approval to prime minister Neville Chamberlain`s signing of the Munich Agreement on 30 September 1938 that the Sudetenland was to send Czechoslovakia to Germany and, more broadly, approval of Chamberlain`s appeasement strategy towards Hitler. Although vehemently opposed to both the Munich Agreement and the British policy of appetite, Churchill was in the minority, and the day after his speech the House of Commons voted by 366 votes to 144 in favour of confirming the request. [3] [4] It`s September 21 at 1:20 a.m.m. You should immediately join your French colleague and point out to the Czechoslovak Government that his response does not correspond in any way to the critical situation that the Franco-English proposals should avoid and, if respected, we believe that they would lead to an immediate German invasion if they were made public. You should ask the Czech government to withdraw this response and urgently consider an alternative that takes into account the realities. The Franco-English proposals remain, in our opinion, the only chance to avoid an immediate German attack. On the basis of the answer to the examination, I would have no hope of obtaining a valid result for a second visit to Mr Hitler and the Prime Minister would be obliged to lift the provisions to that effect. We therefore call on the Czech Government to think urgently and seriously before creating a situation for which we cannot take any responsibility.

Of course, we should have been prepared to present the Czech arbitration proposal to the German Government if we had thought that there was a chance of positive consideration at this stage, but we cannot believe for a moment that it would now be acceptable. Nor do we believe that the German Government would regard this proposal as a proposal that can be settled by arbitration, as proposed by the Czech Government. . . .